Reminder: Tomorrow night is our Studio Grand Opening party!

We’ve been working double-time these last few months to complete our new studio, and we’re ready to share it with you! 

WHO: You and your significant other, friend, colleague, or pal! 
WHAT: A first look at our new fine art printing studio! It’s bigger, better, and has a view (we are on the 5th floor)
WHERE: The Saw Mill Furniture Company building. 
3403 Piedmont Avenue, Oakland, CA 94611. 
WHEN: Saturday, July 26, 2014, 7pm - 11pm
BONUS: You’ll get to meet Ryan Hendon, owner of MARK RYAN Fine Art Services, plus other members of the Bay Area’s arts community, or catch up with the ones you already know!

Now what? You can simply show up, but it’d be better if you RSVP

 

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We’ve made the first set of large prints in our new studio! A group of 40” x 60” and 24” x 36” prints by William Binzen, from the Waking Dream series. Printed on Canson Baryta Photographique paper- a lovely replacement for the now-defunct Ilford Gold Fiber Silk.

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Check out our new studio tables - 5 feet by 10 feet in size! Makes handling large prints a breeze.

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The show opens next month in Reno at Liberty Gallery…check it out!

We Are Moving!

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We signed a lease on a new studio in the penthouse suite of the Saw Mill building! This historic location (built in 1916) is on Piedmont Avenue and Broadway, in Oakland. It’s five minutes away from our 37th Street studio, and much easier to find. We’ll be on the top floor. Don’t worry, there are elevators!

It had been getting a little crowded at our 37th Street studio, and when the stork delivered our Canon 60” wide-format printer in February, it was the last straw. Ever since, we’ve been playing a never-ending game of Tetris with the studio, so we’re very pleased to have more space. Four times more space, to be exact. And we’re going to need it, because we’re expanding!

We have partnered with Mark Ryan Fine Art Services to offer mounting, framing, and crating services. Going forward, you will be able to get drum scans, artwork captures, fine art prints, mounting, framing, crating, and shipping all under one roof. And that’s not even mentioning the other services we offer, like image manipulation, book layout design, and exhibition planning.

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As of this writing, we don’t have a set move date, but we’re aiming to be installed in the new space by the end of June. Our 37th Street location will remain open during the transition.

We’ll have more information on our new partnership and new studio space soon, and we’ll keep you posted with updates with our newsletter, so stay tuned!

Paper Chase

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It’s pretty amazing the choices we have for making prints these days. Printer technology advances all the time. There’s a constant stream of new papers to print on. Paper recommendations are one of the most common questions we answer. But there’s another question that pops up from artists. “What do YOU print your own work on?”

I learned digital fine art printing with the Lightjet (aka digital c-printer). As Epson made improvements in inkjet printing, we began printing more with Epsons and less with Lightjets. Moving away from the Lightjet was easy. Lightjet paper choices are limited to gloss or semimatte. If you like to proof your work (I do), you’d need to wait a day or two between rounds of proofing. Lastly, c-prints are not as archival as the archival pigment prints made with modern inkjet printers.

For color printing I use the Canon ipf9400 printer. It’s now the third generation Canon printer I’ve owned, and a joy to use. The print quality is outstanding. We’ve had far less clogging, faster output, better ink longevity and scuff resistance than when we used Epson printers. You can run all kinds of media through it, including photo papers, watercolor, canvas, tyvek, and ordinary brown kraft paper.

Premium Semimatte is one of my go-to papers for color printing. It is an N surface paper, similar to Fuji Crystal Archive matte paper minilabs use to make digital c-prints. Premium Semimatte has a fine surface texture; less so than E surface papers like Premium Luster. It’s a great performer with color images; capable of deep blacks, bright whites, and saturated colors. And it’s an affordable paper, in comparison to the fine art papers we stock from Hahnemuhle and Canson.

For color printing on fine art papers, I’m partial to Hahnemuhle Photo Rag Baryta and Photo Rag 308 (matte). These fine art papers share a similar paper base and have a natural paper base color. They aren’t artificially brightened with optical brightening agents.

Photo Rag Baryta has a pearl surface with slight sheen, less so than Premium Luster. Since it has a non-matte surface, it has deeper blacks than the Photo Rag 308 version. For color printing, there’s just a greater sense of depth to the prints than those made on RC papers. The 308 matte version is truly matte (no gloss whatsoever), and is very similar to hot press watercolor paper. (We use it a lot for artwork reproductions). I personally find that for color prints, I prefer the increased contrast of the Photo Rag Baryta.

You can also read our guide to fine art digital printing papers and find out more information on other papers we offer.








Huck Magazine talks with Andrew Paynter about his Working Artist series, which documents the lives, work, and studio spaces of artists including Thomas Campbell, Serena Mitnik-Miller, and The Mattson 2. One of the few commercial photographers who still shoots film, Andrew has done work for Converse, Philip Lim, Union Made, Hiut Denim, and Juice Design, to name only a few. Some of his Working Artists portraits of Claudio Berlotti, Geoff McFetridge, and Evan Hecox are currently featured on the Rivet Press.

Huck Magazine talks with Andrew Paynter about his Working Artist series, which documents the lives, work, and studio spaces of artists including Thomas Campbell, Serena Mitnik-Miller, and The Mattson 2. One of the few commercial photographers who still shoots film, Andrew has done work for Converse, Philip Lim, Union Made, Hiut Denim, and Juice Design, to name only a few. Some of his Working Artists portraits of Claudio Berlotti, Geoff McFetridge, and Evan Hecox are currently featured on the Rivet Press.